Alaska Women Speak: The Call

Hi Everyone!

Just wanted to post that Alaska Women Speak has accepted my fiction story “The Call” for their summer issue.  Check them out and see more work from some great Alaskan writers.  More details when they go to print!

J.L.

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Throwback Thursday: Crabapples

This one also was featured in 13Chairs‘ first issue.  Check out their spring issue free and see this poem and more.

Crabapples

You resisted Eve’s temptation

for far too long, passing

by the crabapple tree each day

with the stroller filled with the overtired,

but never passed out, fussy toddler.

 

The fruit hangs low,

red with a bit of yellow,

that by the day is eclipsed

by the growing red.

 

Each day you long for a bite

Because you think

it will remind you of Sky Queen,

the blue bike with the cloud seat

and the white straw basket

with three plastic daisies

of pink, blue and purple.
In the Midwest of your memory,

the crabapple tree reclines like a “y”

in your babysitter’s backyard.

In the summer, you rode

Sky Queen through the grass and crushed apples,

making your own sour applesauce on the ground.

 

For hours you gazed at the “y” and

from its branches, took the green apples and

threw them at the neighbor’s kid.

From its leaves, you sought shelter

from the July heat before you took bites

from the dirty apples

until your babysitter’s old finger shook

and sentenced you inside.

 

In Alaska, as the clouds spill low around the mountains,

the September morning frosts over the tree,

yet the fruit still stands,

inviting you to take it in like an old friend

who shows up at your doorstep unexpected.

So, you invite it in without looking,

and just as the child once did,

your now mature hands reach

over the stranger’s fence to pluck the reddest fruit.

 

Taking a bite, you are looking at the “y” again

and Sky Queen is your ride,

but now the fruit is bitter,

not tart like you once remembered.

You hear the buzzing

and see the yellow jackets

as they sting your feet

and suddenly, you notice the present world,

and you toss the bitter apple into the street drain,

and bid the uninvited guest to go away.

 

 

Dirty Chai: Two Poems

I am pleased to announce that Dirty Chai has accepted two of my poems “Time Out” and “Stew of the Dead” for their blog, Missed Connections. Both poems center on childhood nostalgia–perfect for the end of May and the start of that long summer vacation.

Check them out!  More details when they post!

J.L

Throwback Thursday: A Fireweed Dies

This poem was published in 13Chairs first issue.  Check out this poem and more at 13chairs.  Free eBook issue.

 

The Fireweed Dies

a slow death in the dwindling Alaskan sun

surrounded by its closest family of weeds.

As the daylight shortens

and the August rain comes

the fireweed, once admired for its magenta beauty,

its petals that set the roadside aglow,

fades, growing white with age.

 

Its fragile cotton  sways in the wind

until the rains come and its days are labored

as life draws to a close.

In its last breath, the final puff leaves its lips

and takes flight with a gust of wind,

before falling to the earth and decay,

leaving its skeletal stalks to survive

the fall solstice only to be buried in the winter snow.

3 Poems Accepted: Alaska Women Speak

Hi everyone!  Just got word that Alaska Women Speak has accepted 3 of my poems for their summer issue!  The theme for this issue is Lost (and found).  My poems focus on brief time in my life, just days after I graduated with my undergraduate degree, when I lost sight in my right eye:  Someone May Have Said, The Diagnosis, and All Things Mundane.  More details when the issue goes to press!

 

 

J.L.